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Building Blocks of Success Part 2!

By Kimberly Faye Greenberg, Sep 29 2015 11:21PM

My “Building Blocks of Success Blog” was very popular. So…i’m offering more to add the mix!!


Building Blocks Part Two!


1) Have your hands in as many pots as possible. Why? I like to use a garden analogy: plant many seeds so at least one will grow. Things in this business NEVER go as planned. The more you do and are involved with, the more likely one of those seeds will grow. One of those projects will plant the seed for another more lucrative project in the future.


2) Never say no to opportunities. Enough people will do that for you! Of course, with that I say stay true to your 'moral' code. Enough said.


3) Auditions are crazy and very unrealistic as to what we are actually hired to do. Just look at them as "snippets" of our best work/talents on display. Thus, instead of letting them get to your nerves, try to look at them as your time to shine, perform, and do what makes you different then everyone else. You only have, at most, a few minutes (if you are lucky) so make them count to let the world know who YOU are!


4) Although there are auditions all year long, there are traditionally two big audition seasons in New York: fall and winter. Those are the best times to be here for someone who is looking be seen by a lot of people in a short period of time. September and October are when regional theatres come to audition for all the big holiday shows; February and March, when theatres are casting all the summer shows (this is also known as Summer Stock season). Many national tours going on the road, audition at this time as well as they want to secure the talent who probably will also get booked for summer stock work.


5) Receiving callbacks for jobs are the best sign that you are on the right path. As several of my teachers have said to me, a callback is basically the theatre saying we love you, but now we have to look at other factors, i.e. height, weight, hair, who you're working with, do we need another alto? etc. Always congratulate yourself on a callback and keep doing what you are doing. As my teachers have also said, it takes at least ten callbacks to actually get a job! Speaking from experience, that is true; so trust you are moving in the right direction.


6) If you are not getting callbacks, meet with a respected coach/teacher in the business. Make sure they are being honest with you and not just telling you how great you are. You want to know what you can do to improve or make yourself more marketable, so that an audition will get you a callback or a job. Be willing to hear criticism because it is the only way you can get better. Trust your gut as you will know when that criticism is coming from a place of truth and helping to make you better, or coming from someone just putting their fears and own personal issues onto you. If that is the case, run! Far, far away!


7) Know that no other's route is the same as yours. Your friend may make it in a Broadway show once he moves to New York, and you may not make it for years. That's ok!!! Everyone's journey is different. Broadway is not the end-all-be-all of a career.


8) Everything works out for the best and one must make the most out of every opportunity. Disappointment and rejection are around every corner in this business. Take what comes for what it is, and know a better job is just around the corner. When that job does turn up, make the most of it. Working is the time when everything comes together. Again, make that garden grow.


9) Find a "day" job within the theatre. It makes your network grow and keeps you almost doing what you love. Other opportunities you didn't even imagine can spawn from working in the theatre. For example, along with performing, I am a wardrobe dresser on Broadway. I have dressed over 12 Broadway shows and have worked with a lot of people who now know me. It has helped me a lot in my performing career, to say the least.


10) Find what makes you unique and create new projects of your own. Don't be one of many; be one of a few. This is a hard one, especially in today's theatre where many of the shows require people of similar voice types and looks. You have to remember that YOU are unique and you will stand out of the chorus and become someone to remember. Find those qualities in yourself that make that person behind the table remember you amongst the other 300 faces at the audition. Sooner or later that job will come along when your skill set is needed and YOU will be the ONLY one they remember.


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Kimberly Faye Greenberg

 

KimberlyFayeGreenberg

Executive Producer/Creator of Broadwayblogspot.com

 

In addition to being a professional performer, Kimberly is also a Performing Arts Consultant, Braodway backstage swing wardrobe dresser, speaker, educator, and has been a featured in numerous publications/oncamera as an expert on the NY theatre scene.

 

Please visit Kimberly's Bio on the "About Us" page for more information.

 

You may reach out to Kimberly with comments, questions or subjects you would like covered on this blog as it pertains to Broadway/theatre community and/or pursuing the business at kimberly@Kimberlyfayegreenberg.com

 

www.kimberlyfayegreenberg.com

 

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